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Mississippi Moments Podcast

After fifty years, we've heard it all. From the horrors of war to the struggle for civil rights, Mississippians have shared their stories with us. The writers, the soldiers, the activists, the musicians, the politicians, the comedians, the teachers, the farmers, the sharecroppers, the survivors, the winners, the losers, the haves, and the have-nots. They've all entrusted us with their memories, by the thousands. You like stories? We've got stories. After fifty years, we've heard it all.
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Now displaying: January, 2010
Jan 5, 2010

After cotton is picked, the cotton fibers, called lint, must be separated from the seeds in a process known as “ginning.”  James Gray went to work for the Torrey Cotton Gin in Port Gibson as a young man. He explains the cotton ginning process and the importance of doing it correctly.

Jan 5, 2010

Ethel Patton D’Anjou of Alcorn recounts the story of her grandparents’ decision to leave the family farm in Carlisle in the late 1800s and journey to the newly opened Alcorn College.

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