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Mississippi Moments Podcast

These are the stories of our people in their own words. From sharecroppers to governors, the veterans, artists, writers, musicians, leaders, followers, all those who call Mississippi home. Since 1971 we've collected their memories. The technology has changed, but our mission remains the same: to preserve those wonderful stories. Listen to Mississippi Moments Monday through Friday. at 12:30pm on MPB think radio.
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Now displaying: October, 2014
Oct 31, 2014
MSMo 418 Lou Mallory - Country Folks Can Survive

Lou Mallory of Natchez grew up on a small farm in the Red Hills of Georgia.  In the episode, she recalls how the family barely survived raising cotton, but were happy none the less.

She explains that her father used to make syrup from sugar cane as a way to earn extra money.  She remembers eating a lot of syrup when there was not much else.

Mallory learned to sew her own dresses out of necessity. She became a seamstress as an adult and her tailor shop was a Natchez fixture for 45 years until she retired in 1998.

(photo of sugar cane mill: The Florida Center for Instructional Technology, Univ. of South Florida)

Oct 24, 2014
MSMo 417 Lt. Gov. Evelyn Gandy - A Life of Public Service

Evelyn Gandy of Hattiesburg came from a politically active family. In this episode, she discusses her decision to consider a career in politics at an early age.

From 1947, when she was elected to the Mississippi House of Representatives, to 1959 when she became the first woman elected to statewide office as treasurer, Gandy always tried to make whatever office she held more responsive to the people.It was a philosophy she carried from her position as Insurance Commissioner to when she was elected the first woman Lt. Governor in 1975.

Gandy credits her success in office to a desire to work with others and a respect for her predecessors.

Evelyn Gandy passed away on December 27, 2007.

Oct 14, 2014
MS Mo 416 Ray Guy, Pt. 2 - Waiting for the Call

After being nominated and passed over seven times for induction into the Pro Football Hall of Fame, former NFL punter, Ray Guy, was used to waiting by the phone.  In this episode, he explains how the eighth time promised to be different.

Ensconced in his New York hotel room on Super Bowl weekend, Guy found himself sitting by the phone once again, wondering if this would finally be the year he got the call.

Ray Guy was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame on August 2nd, 2014.  He continues to work for his alma mater, Southern Miss.

Oct 14, 2014
MS Mo 415 Ray Guy, Pt. 1 Hall of Fame Punter

William Ray Guy came to Hattiesburg, MS to play football for Southern Miss in 1970.  As punter for the Golden Eagles, Guy’s kicks were known for their distance and pinpoint accuracy.

In this episode, Guy discusses his decision to play for USM.  He also explains why for him, strategy was just as important as power.

In the 14 seasons Guy punted for the Oakland Raiders, the term hang-time was coined to describe his high, booming kicks.  He discusses why they were so high and the time he hit the Super Dome TV screen.

Ray Guy became the first punter to be inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in August of 2014.

Oct 2, 2014

Chinese American, Professor John P Quon grew up living in the back of his family’s store in Moorhead, Mississippi. In this episode, he recalls slipping off and exploring the downtown area at a young age.

Every member of the Quon family was expected to help out in the store.  Quon remembers learning how to make change at the age of five. 

Eventually, the Quon family decided to buy a home in Moorhead.  He explains how an anonymous letter led his father to purchase a cotton farm instead.

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