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Mississippi Moments Podcast

After fifty years, we've heard it all. From the horrors of war to the struggle for civil rights, Mississippians have shared their stories with us. The writers, the soldiers, the activists, the musicians, the politicians, the comedians, the teachers, the farmers, the sharecroppers, the survivors, the winners, the losers, the haves, and the have-nots. They've all entrusted us with their memories, by the thousands. You like stories? We've got stories. After fifty years, we've heard it all.
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Now displaying: January, 2013
Jan 25, 2013

In 1963, Charles Dunagin was hired by newspaper publisher Oliver Emmerich to be the editor of the McComb Enterprise-Journal.  He recalls the turbulent summer of 1964 and his paper’s efforts to report the racial violence.
Dunagin also recounts the bombing of civil rights workers that summer and how his own family was threatened with the same fate. Enjoy the extra details in this extended version of the original.



Jan 18, 2013

During the Big Band Era, Dances were an important social activity for young people. Frances Joyner of Tupelo recalls her first dance and staying out all night. 

Organized dances had unique customs and vernaculars. Joyner explains the terms Check-In List, Stag Line, No-breaks and Specials. Joyner also remembers dancing on the roof of the Peabody Hotel in Memphis.

Please enjoy this extended version of the original broadcast.

 

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